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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
as first and foremost as a foreign policy nation security president. that was what he really loved to do. that what really met to him the most. the idea that you would have the president of the united states like barack obama, who has, in my view, actually, pragmatic and reasonable foreign policy, but for whom policy is enough, but not a priority. i think richard nixon would have great difficulty identifying with that. the second thing is, the thing which i think in common if you talk about richard nixon and ronald reagan was, obviously, they were fairly big men in their own way, in a different way, and they never would say my party, my republican party, right or wrong. what i think they would say, and reagan arian takelated well, i will not speak ill of a fellow republican. when you hear this kind inside the republican party, and when you have a crisis like that, few republican senators essentially, like that administration and focusing on tactical errors of the departed, there is something -- something that ronald reagan and richard nixon, in my view, would not be able to identify with
on foreign policy you're seeing a robust left presence. i want to go back. i think the more interesting thing here is the new coalitions forming. when you see code pink and freedom work joining together for a rally. >> that means the world is over. >> that means america has to is the up and take notice we're doing something really troubling. hopefully the president will show leadership and take accountability for it. >> in a weird way not everything has to be partisan. >> lets not go too crazy. >> not get ahead of ourselves. waiting for president obama to speak at the welcoming ceremony for new fbi director james comey. >>> former vice president dick cheney cast in a new light. we will discuss cheney doctrine and peter baker's incredibly awesome new book next on "now." ready to run your lines? okay, who helps you focus on your recovery? yo, yo, yo. aflac. wow. [ under his breath ] that was horrible. pays you cash when you're sick or hurt? [ japanese accent ] aflac. love it. [ under his breath ] hate it. helps you focus on getting back to normal? [ as a southern belle ] aflac. [ as a cowboy ]
frank discussions. mark, you and i have covered foreign policy a long time. this is a very unhappy group of people. to a certain extent there's spying everywhere. we know that. it's a little shock. there's gambling at mr. rick's. the germans want the same special relationship of no spying agreement that we have with the uk. at the same time, i think there really is anger about they said the flash point was merkel's cell phone. >> yeah, i think that's right, andrea. it's not just anger but embarrassment on their part. remember, the first allegations of potential nsa surveillance in europe came up during the summer. at the time the germans were among those saying we understand it. we think as a dispute it's ebbing away. our concerns have been more or less met. i think there's now a feeling they climbed down and didn't make a huge case out of it in the summer only to find out it was more persuasive, lasted longer and involved the top official and their government. so they have a lot of egg on their own face. what was interesting about the long article der spiegel published over the weekend,
an impact on u.s. foreign policy, on the way it talks and discusses and not only that, collects information, and it's also having an impact in the fact that, you know, lots of people in europe, especially leaders, are not cutting the u.s. as much slack as they might have done in the past. partly, they're saying, because the u.s. under the obama administration, is backing off a lot of the burden sharing, a lot of the heavy lifting that traditionally the u.s. has done in support of its allies over the past. >> because of the fallout, bought of the anger amongst the world leaders, julian, do you think someone's head should roll over this? >> well, we're going to see what the administration does. i think two things to remember. president obama himself raised a lot of the expectations about the differences with how he would conduct national security operations and those resonated both here and around the world. so it might be that in the end, he tries to blame someone. he himself now by -- with this report coming out that he ordered this to stop, it's something of an admission this shouldn't be
security adviser reordered priorities on foreign policy and this is all part of that. explain what you think it happening and how it's perceived overseas. >> the administration is stating a new approach to the region in which they are being pretty explicit about u.s. difficulty in determining the outcome of what they view the civil war in syria, rather than try to pretend they can shape it decisively. pulling back from that. described the approach generally as one of strategic humility recognizing there are limits to american power as we certainly saw it in the iraq war and afghanistan. i think what's bothering the people, the situation in syria is so violent, the loss of life so great, it's going to get worse this winter. we're going to have tens of thousands of people suffering in the cold and dying i fear. it's understandable that members of congress are upset. i haven't heard anybody, including the angry senators, propose a strategy that's much more coherent than what the administration is putting out. >> you were the first to report on how angry the saudis are, angry about the pre
allegations threaten to disrupt foreign policy with u.s. allies. >> i think the revelations from snowden and the secrets revealed are doing significant damage to our bilateral relationships with germany, with mexico, with the other countries to where the suggestion is that we've listened in. i think we have repair work to do and hard questions to ask of the n.s.a. about what's really happening in this program. >> congressman peter king, the chairman of the house homeland security committee said america should stop apologizing. >> the reality is the n.s.a. has saved thousands of lives in the united states, france and germany and throughout europe. the french is someone to talk. they have carried out spying operations against the united states, both the government and industry. as far as germany, that's where the hamburg blot began which started 9/11. the french and germans and other european countries, we are not doing this for the fun of it. >> former vice president dick cheney agrees the u.s. should remain cautious. >> the overall capabilities are important and need to be preserved. >>
. and finally, turn to what is the -- what do the implications of this an how we implement foreign policy. with that sort of an overarching on the topic i like to see us cover. i'm going it start with the first question on the threat we face and why we need -- feel we need security. if there are no benefits with e wouldn't have be having the discussion. with that, george, i would like to turn to you. how has the threat of terrorism changed over the past decade and how have our security and -- it's changed, henry, i think a few relatively significant ways. first, it is a threat than it was ten to fifteen years ago. it's not necessarily aligned bay group by ideology and other driving factors which may be complaint about how we are conducting ourselves in their view. secondly, the threat seems to progress at time very rapidly. what may appear to be a localized threat today perhaps in some obscure part of the world could in fact be on the doorstep tomorrow. lastly, it has significantly. they don't necessarily appear based on their actions and recent actions are indicators of that. that necess
, you would probably be upset, you could understand it at some level because spying is part of foreign policy, but you are a human being and you would be ticked off and she is. >> united states is not the only country that spies on world leaders. madeline albright said that once she was at the united nations and said. >> rick: a french are ambassador asked her about something she said on a phone call. this is not unusual that people spy. >> a group of soldiers in mosl, injured more than 150, it raises this month's death toll to 545 people killed. a surge in sectarian violence has killed more than 500,000 people around iraq. >>> in line with agreement to eliminate all of the weapons by mid 2014. al jazeera's kimberly dukehart has more. >>> syria is meeting an ambitious deadline set by opcew to destroy its lethal stockpile by next year. syria handed over the detail thursday ahead of its october 27th deadline. opcw is not releasing what their report says but it did say the syrian government disclosed 23 chemical weapon sights, the head said last week that the country has so far been coo
-- on how to achieve a foreign- policy objective. in on personal cell phone calls, does that go too far? guest: our leaders need to apply a balancing test. they have to weigh the foreign intelligence game from such a sensitive axes, like you are saying, in particular intercept of a foreign leader's phone call. a foreign-policy flap would result if it was disclosed. you have to apply that balancing. i think judging from the newspapers that is what the white house is doing this week. they are reviewing the posture of the intelligence community on these collection priorities. are going to apply this test to see what makes sense for the country. appropriate?back guest: it is safe to say the snow back -- the snowden relation did -- revelation caused blowback. host: he was a game changer in all this, would you agree? caller: i think so because this is one of the greatest leaks and compromises in american intelligence in our history. it is the equivalent of giving the other team our playbook. going to be looking back on the snowden years for years to come, perhaps as a point when some of our c
on people relying on the new health care system. >>> plus, a tough week for the president's foreign policy. new revelations about u.s. spying on allies, including the bugging of the german chancellor's phone. undermines critical relationships at a sensitive time. >>> and does the mideast trust this president? the fallout between syria and iran. the conflicts of global influences ahead. our roundtable is talking about politics and parenting this week after maryland's attorney general is spotted at a beach party where mine oors are drink. and nbc's brian williams reflects on hurricane sandy, one year ago. the wounds that haven't healed on the jersey shore are personal to him. all of that is ahead on "meet the press" on sunday, october 27. >>> from nbc news in washington, the world's longest-running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> and good sunday morning to you. obama care fix is on, but will it work? here are some of the latest developments. the end of november is the timeline the administration is now targeting to have the obama care website running smoothly. the latest re
interests as a result of this revelation is as important as the foreign policy consequences, because what european company will want to use american networking capacity and other types of computer technologies as a result of this. finally, one other thing. i'm really embarrassed for this white house. i feel awfully sorry for the president because this is basically going to undermine the -- our transatlantic alliance for many years to come, just at a time when we're negotiating an iran agreement. where our european allies are so important to us. >> meanwhile there are some republican leaders coming out, republican congressman peter king defending the u.s. spying on world leaders. take a listen to this. >> i think the president should stop apologizing, stop being defensive. the reality is the nsa has saved thousands of lives, not just in the united states but also in france and germany and throughout europe. and we're not doing this for the fun of it. this is to gather valuable intelligence which helps not just us but also helps the europeans. >> so, mark, we have allies that are upset with
states, through our conduct of foreign policy to the defense matters, to economic matters, and i'm a strong supporter of it. >> of all of it? >> i'm a strong supporter of our generic capability to collect intelligence. i don't want to comment on any one particular controversy or piece of the programs. >> the white house says that president obama did not know about these spy programs on specific world leaders, especially german chancellor angela merkel. obviously you're not a member of the obama administration, but do you find that credible? could it be that there would be surveillance programs of that type that president obama would not know about? >> jake, i'm not going to get into the specifics. it would be inappropriate if there were such a program, i couldn't talk about it. it would be classified. >> do you think the snowden leaks have hurt america's ability to defend itself? >> i do. i think he's a traitor. i think -- i hope we can catch him at some point and that he receives the justice he deserves. >> how have they hurt the united states? i think there are a lot of people,
million of us are being spied on as well as the rest of the world. if you want to talk about foreign-policy, i have the democrats and republicans, it is not good. we need to take a step back, look at what we're doing and then make wise choices. thanks. chris from california is next. chris on our independent line. think this nsa program has been way out of line since it began during the bush administration where the american people find out about it. president in our past history called nixon who is spying on a hotel and he was forced to resign. whether obama knew about this or not, he supposed to know this and if he did not know he should resign for lack of ability to do his job heard this is insane what we're doing. we are spying on every human being possible am a friend, foe, everything. example that we are sending to children. do think we can rebuild trust in this issue? inler: i think the trust this country has been down the tubes for the last 15 or 20 years. you can show many examples of that. thes not just the nsa, now tpp has been going on for years now. nobody in this country knows
on foreign policy he was pretty good, terrible on domestic policy. and so i, too, had to fight that public image. and i came out of it quite conflicted. >> host: nicole is in michigan city indiana and nicole, your are on booktv with kitty kelley. >> caller: thank you, ms. kelly. i'm really enjoying the program and i just admire you and i love your approach to writing unauthorized biographies. i'm an aspiring writer myself and i would like to know, how do you start your day, the whole process and starting her books. are you a morning ride, evening writer, what is your process? >> host: what kind of books are you writing? >> caller: well, it's a book on how to get married, because there's a lot of single women, how to get married. [laughter] >> guest: that would be a best seller. >> caller: that's what i'm hoping. and i look at successful women also and how they met their spouses. that i talk to women every day that are in marriages and say, no, how did you major husband. so i'm doing research and also drawing upon my own experience. so how do you start your writing day in which the process
, canada, australia. ashley: has this hurt the u.s. reputation? there has been a number of foreign policy or lack of foreign policy moves that hurt the u.s. reputation. is this another one just added to the pile so to speak? >> if this had come along alone it might have gotten sorted out. i think a lot of europeans and others are quite concerned about the veracity, franklily of the, the administration. and, how much you can rely on their promises. with respect to syria, we virtually said yes, we're going to help. we turned it off at the last minute. it is almost, sometimes, as if it is better to be an enemy of the united states than a friend if you look the way mubarak was dealt with on the one hand. and the way assad is being dealt with on the other. tracy: just to follow up on that, in your article in the journal i thought was so telling. you wrote, we were not leading but rather stumbling along behind. stumbling like a little kid that doesn't know which way to go. is that how you think the world perceives us? >> to some extent, yes. we need to work on this working closely with the alli
, that intelligence capability is enormously important to the united states, to our conduct of foreign policy, to the fed's matters, to economic matters and i'm a strong supporter of it. >> reporter: the director of national intelligence, james clapper announced overnight he's declassifying a trove of documents about collection under the foreign intelligence surveillance act or fisa. later today, clapper and the head of the nsa, keith alexander will be testifying on the hill. kate, we can expect them to face hard questions as well. we'll try to ask some of our own. >> absolutely. review on multiple fronts but what will come of it? jim sciutto, great to see you. thank you so much. >>> the obama administration is facing ongoing criticism on another front. obama care. the president'sed visors are fighting back on twitter, challenging claims millions of people could lose coverage because of the law. the administration is extending the signup window by six weeks. senior white house correspondent brianna keilar is here with the very latest. >> that signup deadline now march 31st. it had been februa
, there are real risks of disclosure. so it's kind of the classic foreign policy dilemma that you have very modest tactical benefits and a huge strategic risk. that has now blown up in our faces. >> bill? >> i would say if you're going to eavesdrop on phone calls of the german chancellor, that has to be something that the president of the united states authorizes and thinks frankly is worth the risk of exposure, as nick says. you can't just have the bureaucracy doing that. i would like to know, did this president or the previous president, for that matter, sanction that and if so, maybe they thought it was worth it. i don't have a principled problem with listening to other people's calls, even some allies, if we think it's important. you shouldn't do it in a haphazard way which generally damages relations with the real ally. >> do you think it's true that the president of the united states would not know that the nsa is listening in to angela merkel's phone conversations? >> you know, i'm a little mystified by that. i talked today to a former senior cia official and asked about that, and this pers
, the difference is the president was awful lucky we had an affordable care act all week because of the foreign policy and here israel dropping bombs in syria on missiles that were sort of underreported was to me a pretty big deal. i mean, we have that problem that's still there. we have the middle east and an i iranian problem and did drop off the screen. i thought that was very important. >> what about obama care? you were telling us earlier repeal and replace with what, right? >> it is not just repeal and replace and go back to vermont. i don't agree with anything but they're doing something different and republicans have to get into exactly what they think it's resetting obama care, redoing it. that's still for another day. >> thank you so much. christine, kayton, david, all thank you so much. thank you for watching. i'm richard lui. i'll see you tomorrow right back here at 3:00 p.m. eastern time but first "disrupt with karen finney." [ male announcer ] this is claira. to prove to you that aleve is the better choice for her, she's agreed to give it up. that's today? [ male announcer ] we'll
the domain of foreign policy, whether the central government is on board because the prime minister of pakistan is going to be briefed by his cabinet in the next few hours and is going to be some sort of outcome from that particular meeting with the prime minister later tonight. >> we will continue to follow that, and thank you. elections turn violent sunday in parts of kosovo and masked men burst in throwing tear gas and smashing ballot boxes and the police were across the city and the first time they are voting in local elections since they declared independence in 2008. when the storm season calms and dangerous exit begins and 50 people are missing after a boat capsized and eight people were rescued and carrying muslims and they are a muslim minority in myanmar and persecuted and 200 people have been killed in violence and hundreds in camps and they tried to flee the country. east of the bay another boat accident killed at least six tourists, a boat capsized and it was over crowded and took on water and sank. the capacity is 150 but there have been more than 200 on board. witness
are facing growing outrage with foreign leaders facing u.s. policy and the outrage that we've been spying on them. a new report that the u.s. has been spying on the german leader for more than a decade. president obama is now apologizing to his closest foreign friends as the nsa leak story gets too close for comfort. word from edward snowden that the u.s. has eavesdropped on frenchmen, even on angela merkel's cell phone. a furious merkel called president obama to complain. >> the president spoke to angela merkel, reassured her that the president is not and will not monitor the chancellor's communications. >> reporter: but the white house did not deny that it had happened. >> is not monitoring, will not monitor. i think you're missing a tense there. you've got your president progressive there, you got your simple future, but you're missing your past progressive. >> reporter: the secretary of state has been putting out fires here, there and everywhere. especially over u.s. policy toward syria. after two years of war and the assad regime's chemical attack killing more than a thousand civilia
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)

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